20 Cities that Americans are moving To and From

Americans have historically taken risks to seek a brighter future. Job opportunities, affordable housing, family and quality of life issues — including weather, crime, outdoor recreation opportunities — all are reasons United States citizens of all ages decide to move from city to city.

It pays for insurance professionals to be aware of shifting demographics and populations. Are potential customers moving in or out of your area?

Forbes recently took a look at the most recent census data on domestic migration — that is movement within the U.S. between metropolitan areas — between 2010 and 2014. They ranked the nation’s 53 largest metro areas based on their annualized rates of population change attributable to migration. Advertisement

1 in 4 millennials moved back to their hometowns over the past 5 years

According to Forbes, data suggests that it’s primarily the young — those aged 25 to 34 — followed by people approaching retirement who tend to migrate within the U.S. Family and friends are a big motivating factor in both age groups. According to the moving company Mayflower, one in four millennials aged 18 to 34 moved back to their hometowns over the past five years. On the other end of the demographic spectrum, older Amercians express a strong desire to live close to their children and grandchildren.

The Southern states continue a longstanding trend of attracting domestic migrants. The oil bust could slow down the allure of some of these cities, but other cities in the South have economies built around business services, manufacturing and technology.

Allure of the West

In this century, two parts of the West have been drawing new residents: the Mountain states and the Pacific Northwest. The vast region extending from Colorado to Oregon has enjoyed generally strong economic growth and reasonable housing costs, particularly in comparison with coastal California.

The nation’s largest cities are not doing well in the migration race, but these areas are not shrinking due to a steady flow of new residents from overseas and an excess in births over deaths. Not surpringly, places that are more affordable, and also have thriving economies, tend to attract new residents, while those with relatively modest economies and high costs fare worse.

Here are the rankings of the 10 winning cities and the 10 losing cities in the race for migrating Americans.

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The Winners – No. 10: Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 6.95 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 184,021

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.67%

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No. 9: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.34 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 37,528

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.70%

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No. 8: Houston, Texas (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 6.49 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 191,796

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.75%

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No. 7: Orlando, Florida (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 2.32 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 72,735

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.79%

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No. 6: Charlotte, North Carolina/South Carolina (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 2.38 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 83,305

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.87%

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No. 5: Nashville, Tennessee (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.79 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 63,477

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.88%

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No. 4: Denver, Colorado (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 2.75 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 103,785

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 0.95%

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No. 3: San Antonio, Texas (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 2.33 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 94,159

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 1.02%

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No. 2: Raleigh, North Carolina (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.24 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 55,920

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 1.14%

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No. 1: Austin, Texas (in-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.94 million

Net domestic migration gain (2010-2014): 126,296

Annual rate of population increase since 2010 from migration: 1.69%

Austin’s job creation rate — over 3 percent growth annually since 2010 — has a great deal to do with its ability to lure new residents not only from other Texas cities, but from the coasts as well, according to Forbes.

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The Losers – No. 10: Milwaukee, Wisconsin (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.57 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 22,597

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.34%

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No. 9: Virginia Beach-Norfolk, Virginia/North Carolina (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.72 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 24,374

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.34%

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No. 8: Los Angeles, California (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 13.26 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 208,635

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.39%

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No. 7: Rochester, New York (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.08 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 17,665

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.39%

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No. 6: Memphis, Tennessee/Mississippi/Arkansas (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.34 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 21,999

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.39%

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No. 5: Cleveland, Ohio (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 2.06 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 38,424

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.44%

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No. 4: Detroit, Michigan (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 4.30 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 89,649

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.50%

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No. 3: Hartford, Connecticut (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 1.21 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 27,425

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.54%

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No. 2: Chicago, Illinois/Indiana/Wisconsin (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 9.55 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 237,666

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.60%

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No. 1: New York, New York/New Jersey/Pennsylvania (out-migration)

Metro area population (2014): 20.09 million

Net domestic migration loss (2010-2014): 528,742

Annual rate of population decrease since 2010 from migration: -.64%

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About robertjrussellcompanies

International Real Estate Agent * Insurance Broker * Radio Talk Show Host * Public Speaker * find out about me - visit http://www.robertjrussellcompanies.com
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